Tag Archive: fangame

Mega Man Maker – IceMan’s Return by Mr X (161588)

Mega Man Maker recently received its first major content patch, adding in new bosses, enemies, abilities, and a general upgrade to just about everything. Even the name has been upgraded from the original Mega Maker! So, I thought now would be a great time to take a look at the levels people are making with all this cool new stuff.

IceMan’s Return makes use of many new tools, but it’s also just a good level all-around. You’re going to have a bad time if you try to make it through this level with just the buster. slippery ice, disappearing yoku blocks, spikes, and plenty of enemies placed in just the right locations to snipe you while you’re trying to reach a new platform all come together in what might initially seem like disastrous level design. Thankfully, IceMan’s Return provides players with a set of four new weapons perfectly designed for overcoming its many hazards.

Aside from the Mega Buster, your arsenal consists of Time Slow, Ice Slasher, Hyper Bomb, and Ring Boomerang. Ring Boomerang is the least important of the lot, though it’s still good for collecting items from flying enemies and those placed on the other side of walls. On the other hand, Time Slow is crucial for dodging enemy projectiles and helps a whole lot with the disappearing blocks, especially the ones near spikes.

Ice Slasher certainly fits the cold theme of this level and its freezing powers come in handy against some of the tougher robots this level throws at you At one point you need to use Ice Slasher to freeze a row of flames to create a bridge, which is a neat gimmick I wish the level played with a bit more, though the lack of any way to gain weapon energy or backtrack in this room is a minor issue.

As for the Hyper Bombs, their high damage and vertical range can come in handy on occasion within the level, but they really shine in the boss fight against Ice Man himself. Ice Man is immune to the Mega Buster, though he takes damage from everything else and you get plenty of weapon energy refills in the corridor leading up to his room. Hyper Bombs are Ice Man’s weakness and, on top of the extra damage, their vertical explosion serves as a counter to his movement pattern.

Overall, this level is really polished. Time Man’s theme matches the icy aesthetic surprisingly well and the ice blocks themselves are broken up with more metallic ones on occasion to prevent the level from looking monotonous. Every enemy feels like it has been placed with care in just the right spot to make the most out of its attack pattern, yet careful weapon usage allows players to overcome any obstacle. Disappearing blocks are likewise common, but always in small groups so players are faced with a variety of small challenges from them rather than a single, frustrating chain. As to length, this level is slightly longer than average, but it maintains consistent mechanical themes while changing things up with plenty of both horizontal and vertical platforming and the checkpoint placement is excellent.

IceMan’s Return is truly a fantastic level to return to after such a big update.

Mega Maker – Defence Ship Yamato92 by M9cao (111279)


Official Site

Aside from the final section, Defence Ship Yamato92 doesn’t do anything overly fancy, but it uses all of its parts very effectively. The primary enemies here are the two types of turrets from the first game as well as Suzies which periodically move vertically or horizontally between walls. As for your weapons, the mega buster is your default and you’re also given access to crash bombs and magnet missiles. I never felt a need to use the crash bombs, but the magnet missiles are very handy for taking out turrets above you.
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Touhou – Wandering Souls


RPGMaker.net Page

You know an indie game has made it big when other indie developers start making fangames based on it and the Touhou series has a ton of fangames. I’ve played my fair share of Touhou fangames over the years and at the end of the day Touhou – Wandering Souls remains not only my favorite Touhou fangame, but one of my favorite freeware indie games. This sidescrolling action RPG perfectly translates the gameplay of a bullet hell shmup series into an entirely different genre alongside some surprisingly deep mechanics and an outright obscene amount of content all while being made in the utterly unlikely RPG Maker VX engine.
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Pokemon Nightmare: Invasion

RPGMaker.net Page

There are dozens, possibly even hundreds, of games out there which boil down to being scary versions of other games, but Pokemon Nightmare: Invasion is a bit different. For a start, this isn’t a reimagining of an existing game, but rather an entirely original origin story where the largely black and white aesthetic recalls old horror and noir movies almost as much as it does the old Game Boy games. The other important factor here is that this is a full-fledged game. While the vast majority of these types of horror games rarely consist of little more than a few minutes of walking around and a few cheap jumpscares (ex: nearly anything based on the Sonic.exe creepypasta), this is a roughly four hour experience filled with combat, exploration, boss fights, puzzles, and a surprisingly engaging plot.

The scope of this game is a bit larger than the other games I’ve chosen for Haunted House Week, but it is still very much about a specific place – Azure City. The protagonist, Jack, is an investigator sent to Azure City to investigate the disturbing disappearance of its residents and it is within this city’s confines where the entire game takes place. Though you never get to meet most of the residents of Azure City, there is a large amount of care put into humanizing them. The use of journals and notes to fill in backstory is a common enough mechanic in games, but here such environmental objects are found exclusively in places where they make sense, such as a note from a friend being on a table or a private journal being in a bedroom. As these journals provide just as much insight into the concerns of the writers themselves as they do into the mystery surrounded Azure City, it becomes possible to determine who lived in each building and their relationships with the other residents. There is plenty of environmental storytelling to go around, such as Jack remarking on exactly which types of books are found in each bookcase and bloodstains or the lack thereof hinting at the fate of various residents, and players will need to hunt down every clue they can to fully understand both the current events and what happened in the past. Pokemon Nightmare: Invasion also allows for some unusually open exploration; there are a few roadblocks along the way and the main objective is generally clear, but large chunks of Azure City are entirely optional.

The aesthetics are also handled well as the ordinarily black and white screen becomes subtly tinted at certain points and occasional splashes of color really stand out, such as when bloodstains are present. Sound direction is also excellent with radios you can turn on to play some of the standard, upbeat songs from the franchise to contrast with the surroundings and eerie or severely distorted music plays during combat and other encounters. Speaking of combat, it isn’t awful, but it’s definitely the one notable weakness to this game. On the one hand, the fact that this is a sort of origin story for the Pokemon themselves means that Jack spends the majority of the game personally fending off these creatures with an actual gun and I like how enemy sprites are changed to become visibly injured when they get low on health rather than resorting to using health bars or no indication at all. On the other hand, it is pretty clear that this game’s action-oriented combat system is limited by the RPG Maker 2000 engine, which wasn’t designed with such systems in mind, and most fights devolve into awkwardly tricking enemies into running into furniture or other barriers while you safely shoot and strafe around from the other side. Thankfully, combat is fairly quick and doesn’t occur often enough to bog down the rest of the experience. I was completely caught off guard by how invested I ended up becoming in this game’s plot and characters; both the mystery and horror elements here are top-notch and the execution is all-around excellent.

Link Stuck in Castlevania

Game Page || Zelda Classic Engine

What video game franchise could possibly embody the spirit of Halloween better than The Legend of Zelda? Well, probably Castlevania for one, so it’s a good thing someone decided to combine the two! Yes, it’s an indie fangame which combines elements of two of my favorite franchises and it’s even made in Zelda Classic, a rather impressive game engine which deserves an article of its own one day. Sticking a character from one game into stages and general locations from another is nothing new, but Link Stuck in Castlevania is impressive both for how far it pushes the Zelda Classic engine itself and for how far it takes the experience.

Things start out a bit slow with Link going through some fairly linear and simplistic zombie and bat-filled hallways resembling the start of the original NES version of Castlevania, but this mediocre pace doesn’t last for long. Link can break bricks and shatter candles to quickly gain access to all sorts of upgrades from both worlds, including hearts, maximum health increases, potions, maps, subweapons belonging to both him and the Belmonts, and even those blocks with Roman numerals which allow more subweapons to be on the screen simultaneously. The early stages mostly stick to layouts resembling those found in their equivalent stages in Castlevania, but later levels become increasingly creative with looping hallways, puzzles, hidden rooms, and less blatantly linear layouts. Once you get the warp whistle in Stage 2 you can also freely travel back to previously completed stages to hunt for any missed items or upgrades and the stages themselves even have one-way warps serving as a sort of fast travel service. Stairs can be troublesome as it can be difficult to tell when you’re officially ‘off’ of a staircase and far more than once I ended up walking back down some stairs while trying to move left or right and most bosses are on the underwhelming side of things (the first boss can even fly out of the room and force you to reset the fight), but the later stages, and especially the large final area, easily make up for any shortcomings. Link Stuck in Castlevania is a great crossover for fans of Belmonts and Hyrulian heroes alike which goes to great lengths to combine strengths from both series and to blend the nostalgic confines of the corridors of Dracula’s castle with new and unexpected twists and surprises.